Quick Study Index, Module 7



Reynold's number
Causes of turbulence
Relationship of flow rate and perfusion pressure, with and without streamline flow (Figure 6.01)

Aortic systolic turbulence

Relationship of flow rate and perfusion pressure in Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids (Figure 6.03)
Factors causing flow not to be initially proportional to perfusion pressure
Relative viscosity as a function of shear rate in Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids (Figure 6.02)

Shear

Erythrocyte / plasma distribution varies with vessel caliber (Table 6.01)
The concept of the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect (Figure 6.04)
Factors responsible for the Fahraeus-Lindqvist (Sigma) effect
Advantages of the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect

Cell / plasma inhomogeneity in the circulation
Capillary flow


The circulatory design questions

Why hemoglobin is packed inside erythrocytes

Possible solutions to the question as to how large the terminal vessels (capillaries) should be (Figure 6.05)

Computation of closest red blood cell packing

Destructive influences in low flow states (Figure 6.06)

Optimal concentration for the packets (Figure 6.07)


Right above: Osborne Reynolds, 1842-1912, mathematician; work in fluid dynamics.



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